< Back to BLOG

The blurring concept of on- and offline for GenZ The blurring concept of on- and offline for GenZ

At JWT Intelligence, they’ve conducted new research on Gen Z. A generation they call “the fledgling generation, born after 1995, that follows the Millennials”. They are the first true mobile generation, they don’t know what a landline is and they take high speed internet, available anytime and anywhere, for granted: the diffrence between offline and online is becoming more and more a blurry phenomenon for this generation. A quarter of Gen Z participants in this study said all or most of their social-network friends live a plane journey away.
The report (available for download after registration, fully worth it I guess) is based around a survey of Gen Z consumers and their parents in the U.S. and the U.K., and it provides a snapshot of the generation by focusing on their digital habits: how they use connected devices to socialize, spend, shop and muche, much more. I really like the fact that they’ve did a lot effort to track down the thoughts on this topic by the parents of GenZ: that’s food for another blogpost in the near future.

Facebook as a fact of life

For most teens, the study concludes, Facebook is already a fact of life. A few other social networks factor in as well—more than a third of teens are on Twitter— with only a tiny percentage opting out of these digital networks alltogether. Facebook and most other social networks require members to be at least 13 years old, but tweens want in as well, and almost half say they are using Facebook.

Methodology
JWT’s “Gen Z: Digital in their DNA” is the result of quantitative, qualitative and desk research conducted by JWTIntelligence throughout the year. Specifically for this report, they’ve conducted a quantitative study in the U.S. and the U.K. using SONAR, JWT’s proprietary online tool, from March 1-3. They surveyed 400 adults, 200 children aged 8-12 and 200 teenagers aged 13-17 (data are weighted by age and gender).

Share on LinkedIn9Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter

Posted in NextGens