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Gen Y Social Shopping

Social shopping by Gen Y/millennials. It’s only a small subject and part of a larger, fashionably designed and very interesting research done by JWT about social shopping and e-commerce (you can download it here after subscription). In the report, JWT has made a distinction on social shopping for 3 ‘generations’: The Millennials (20-33, or what we here like to call Gen Y), Gen X (34 – 46) and the babyboomers. Millennials are driving a tech-enabled culture of sharing and social influence. Half of American and British Millennials said that when they see a product they’re excited about, they frequently post a status update about it on Facebook.

If they see a friend has recommended something on Facebook or other places online, 55% said they’re more likely to purchase it. And 53% have asked for opinions from friends on Facebook about a purchase. Check out this chart on the differences in social influence and social sharing between these generations:


The data shows it’s the Millennial generation that’s most open to and interested in Facebook-commerce. More than four in 10 Millennial respondents in the U.S. and U.K. said they wish there were more opportunities to shop within Facebook, versus 26% of Gen Xers and 16% of Boomers. Nearly half agreed that they spend so much time on Facebook already, they might as well shop there too, compared to a quarter of Gen Xers and 14% of the Boomers. Similarly, 48% said they wish the places where they shop had a page where customers could buy products/services directly on Facebook (27% of Gen Xers and 19% of Boomers said the same). Again, American Millennials are more apt to express interest in F-commerce than those in the U.K.

Summary
At JWT, they’ve given the following description in the report’s management summary:

“This report charts how retailers and other brands are using the social graph to engage consumers wherever they may be, creating more personal, accessible experiences, and to amplify word-of-mouth. We examine three key trends—the rise of Facebook commerce, overlaying the social graph on e-commerce sites and introducing that social graph to the brick and mortar world—looking at what innovative retailers and others are doing in these areas, as well as what’s driving each trend and the significance and potential for marketers.”

3 key trends
At SocialCommerceToday, they’ve defined the 3 key social commerce trends that can be found in the full JWT-report:

  • Trend 1: F-Commerce (commerce on Facebook)  Bringing the Shop to the Consumer
    • Pop-Up Stores (Limited Time/Edition) (Pampers, Rachel Roy, D v. Furstenberg)
    • Digital Stores (Streaming, Downloads, Ticketing)
    • Campus Stores (Kembrel, B&N, Diane von Furstenberg)
    • [Factory] Stores (Express, ASOS)
  • Trend 2: Overlaying the Social Graph Bringing the Social Graph to E-Commerce Sites(Amazon Recommendations, Levi’s Friends Store’, Rotten tomatoes, TrupAdvisor Trip Friends, Copious, eBay coming soon)
    • Facebook Developer Tools (Open Graph)
    • Hyper-Personalisation
    • FOMO (Fear of Missing Out)
  • Trend 3: ‘Socializing’ Brick and Mortar Bringing the Social Graph In-Store (Diesel QR Likes, Macy’s Magic Fitting Room, Pepsi-Co Social Vending Machine)
    • SoLoMo technology mesh (Social, Local, Mobile)
    • ‘Phone a Friend‘ (get advice in-situ)
    • Web 3.0 – (harnessing smart technology & The Web of Things in-store)
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One Response to “Gen Y Social Shopping”

  1. Enkele opvallende berichten over jongeren: gameverslaving, 5 tips voor marketeers, social shopping « Is het nu generatie X, Y of Einstein?

    […] Social shopping by Gen Y/millennials. It’s only a small subject and part of a larger, fashionably designed and very interesting research done by JWT about social shopping and e-commerce (you can download it here after subscription). In the report, JWT has made a distinction on social shopping for 3 ‘generations’: The Millennials (20-33, or what we here like to call Gen Y), Gen X (34 – 46) and the babyboomers. Millennials are driving a tech-enabled culture of sharing and social influence. Half of American and British Millennials said that when they see a product they’re excited about, they frequently post a status update about it on Facebook. (Lees meer van de blogpost hier op Howcoolbrandsstayhot.com) […]

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